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Issue XLI: Mother's Day Special

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XL: You Can Take It With You

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Bug Out Document Protection
    Your home and all its contents can be swallowed up by disaster faster than you'd think possible. A fire, flood, or earthquake can drive you away from your home before you can gather up all the items you need for survival. Here is a list of things to collect and a few ideas to be prepared.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Bug Out   Disaster Preparedness   
    Comments:
    Eugene
    I used web based e-mail before (hotmail) I logged in one day to find my inbox blank. I note to tech support got an automated response that there was a system outage some some data may have been lost. I never did get that mail back. From then on I learned to never trust the web based services like that since there is no gaurente on your data. burn your docs on a CD or USB flash drive. I have a 2G microSD card in my cell phone with has the most important documents of mine on it. Burn extra cd's and store them at your bug out location.
    pisspoorperformer
    Scan your doc's, set up a couple of web-based email accounts for yourself, and email them to yourself. If all of the main internet servers go down for good then everything's f***ed anyway and who needs paper then?
    Jon W. Spead
    Excellent article and a very important point for everyone to consider/take action on, survivalist or not. The world runs on paper (at least on documentation) and basically if you don't have it documented, you didn't do it/it doesn't exist/it isn't true/etc., etc. Something to add is to take photographs of all your vehicles, your entire house inside and outside including all furnishings and especially of any valuables, i.e.; coin or stamp collections, guns, antiques, art work, etc. and I strongly suggest using a film camera (color prints) and storing in archival plastic photo pages in a 3-ring notebook (in your fire safe of course.) Digital storage is no good if you get hit with EMP or the power is gone forever, etc.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Basics: Bug Out Toolkits
    Today's workshops are marvels of modern invention full of dust throwing, wood cutting, steel bending, electric, pneumatic, hydraulic, power packed beasts of convenience that would make Tim Allen proud. But you just beat feet and have to make do without tools that need more than elbow grease. Here's my list of bug out tools.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Disaster Preparedness   Popular   Tools   
    Comments:
    faultroy
    While I think the tools mentioned are extremely well thought out, I seriously question the logic of so many tools for one's bugout kit. Granted, everyone's definition will be different and everyone's tool requirements will be different, but for the most part few if any of those items will be necessary. There is a tendency to want to take everything. The reality is that no one should take more than they can carry on their back comfortably. If you can't do that, you really don't need it. The items mentioned would be great however for a bugout retreat.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Basics: First Aid Kits
    Somewhere between a Band-Aid and a surgical kit is the perfect first aid kit for you. What do you need to have? Will you know what to do with the kit you have? Having the right supplies and training will ensure you are ready to respond.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Camping   Disaster Preparedness   First Aid   Popular   Safety   
    Comments:
    J.White
    I totally agree with the contents that you listed for first aid kits and that "preparers" should get proper first aid training. Any "bug out" scenario could involve a trauma situation. As mentioned in the article, 911 may not be available and hospitals could be overwhelmed. I would add several Israeli Trauma Bandages in different sizes, a few Nasal Airway Tubes and a few SAM Splints to your first aid kit(s). These items are contained in Military Individual First Aid Kits (IFAK) and "Blow Out Kits" or individually from various web sites. I would suggest shopping around on the web for the best prices. RemoteMedical.com is a great place to start. Training videos on how to use Israeli bandages can be found on various sites on the web, such as You-Tube. I would suggest for "preparers" to take a "First Responders" course at your local community college.
    suntzu
    Tampons. They are sterile, absorb large amounts of blood, and are the perfect shape as well for bullet/stab wounds. Plus, they are available in bulk for cheap.
    Jim Dorsett
    To save on weight and space (& money), sterile gauze pads can be substituted for the eye patches. I would also add: 1) occlusive dressing(aluminum foil or vaseline gauze)(for neck, chest, abdominal wounds) 2) mole skin(for blister prevention and treatment)
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXXIX: Ordering Off the Menu

Sorry for the long delay between issues. It has been a crazy/busy time and I have not had the time I would like to dedicate to getting these articles out on a regular basis. I hope to do better.

Thanks, also, to those who have written to me to remind me that you all were looking for more articles. I am glad to know so many look forward to reading them.
  • Trapper's Corner: Armadillo
    If you have ever traveled through the South-Eastern or South-Central parts of the United States then you have seen this animal. It is most often seen on the side of the road, splattered all over the place and known locally as "road kill." However, when you are hungry enough...you eat anything!
    Categories:  Critters   Food   Poison   Traps   
    Comments:
    Cook'em well and wash your hands and tools
    "The only cases of transmission from armadillos to humans have occurred in rare incidents in which people ate undercooked armadillo meat." https://www.msu.edu/~nixonjos/armadillo/faq.html#04
    Tim
    From what I under stand the Armadillo has a body temp too low to get leprosy
    Richard
    I grew up in Arkansas and Hoover hogs were as much a part of our diet as was any other wild critter. I taught survival in th U.S.Army back in the late 70s early 80s at Ft. Hood Tx. Armadillo was constantly on the menu, as it was about the easiest thing out in the wild to catch and could feed a few people a good meal. Once or twice a year I still kill an armadillo or 2 to eat. In nearly 50 years experience with the critter I have always heard about the leprosy problem but have never known anyone that even knew anyone that got it from eating or messing with an armadillo.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Believe it or Don't
    I found the following footnote in a book entitled The Pirates, In an Adventure with Ahab. The author, Gideon DeFoe, Vintage Books, a division of Random House, presents this explanation of a common American phrase.
    Categories:  Ammunition   Armory   History   
    Comments:
    Nobby
    Having spent many years in the Royal Navy also spent time in HMS Victory. A monkey was indeed aready use store for balls. Originally iron then brass or copper, So to freeze the balls off a brass monkey it must have been exptionally cold. A monkey was also a young lad used to supply cartridges from the magazine. To bleed the monkey was to steal small amounts of rum from a sealed barrel. Animals in use were Robins(robands), Frogs (not only for scabbards but the log weight was sometimes nicknamed this), Worms (To ream debris out of canon barrels), Horse (a footrope,running bar or spit of land), Dog (metal staples, the watches from 1600 to 2000), Lark(small tackle), Duck (type of light cotton cavas), Tiger(Captain's Steward), (spit)-Kid/kit(shallow wide bucket for spitting in, it was safer to chew tobacco than smoke, it was an offence to spit out of the gunports if open, tobacco juice made decks slippery) Cat (Soft furry animal for ratting or device made of rope to remove skin from the backs of those who ignored the gunport rule!) Crab, I guess there's more.
    Sean
    Not quite pg13, put the S-Word came about from Ship High In Transit. In the 16th and 17th centuries, everything had to be transported by ship and it was also before commercial fertilizer's invention, so large shipments of manure were common. It was shipped dry, because in dry form it weighed a lot less than when wet, but once water (at sea) hit it, it not only became heavier, but the process of fermentation began again, of which a by-product is methane gas. As the stuff was stored below decks in bundles you can see what could, and did happen. Methane began to build up below decks and the first time someone came below at night with a lantern, BOOOOM! Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was determined just what was happening. After that, the bundles of manure were always stamped with the term "Ship High In Transit" on them which meant for the sailors to stow it high enough off the lower decks so that any water that came into the hold would not touch this volatile cargo and start the production of methane. Thus evolved the term "S.H.I.T." (Ship High In Transport) which has come down through the centuries and is in use to this very day. S.
    Rob
    To elaborate further, earlier versions of the 'Monkey' on a ship was used to hold cannonballs and were made of iron. These cannon balls were stacked in a pyramidal form on the monkey. The monkey had indentation or holes in it, where the base layer of cannon balls were placed so they wouldn't roll around on the ships deck. When temperatures dropped, the holes in the cast iron monkeys would get smaller and blow the cannon balls all over the deck, so to compensate for this phenomenon the monkeys were made out of brass, because brass did not change as readily during temperature fluctuations. Hence the phrase 'cold as a brass monkey'.
    john
    Lock stock and barrel is referring to buying a gun. a "flintLOCK" is the hammer mechanism for a muzzleloader. So you could buy a firearm "lock" the hammer mechanism, stock-the wooden parts, and barrel... meaning the business end of the weapon. This is not a real estate term. A flintlock would be equivalent to buying a car in the old days. so you could buy it in pieces which had to be made custom or you could buy it all at once "lock, stock, and barrel." Happy trails.
    Richard
    The "monkey" is the rack for holding cannon balls, as I am sure you found out. It is (or was) common in many service branches, to give animal names for supporting devices, the device to hold a sword or saber to a belt is a "FROG" and the wire device to hold the points of a collar down is called a collar "FROG" "LOCK, STOCK, AND BARREL" is an old insurance and real estate term. When you purchased a business you could buy the building alone, or you could buy all of it, including the LOCK to secure the STOCK or supplies in side and the BARRELs of stored supplies.
    elfawal
    I, too, was curious about this phrase. I looked up "brass monkey" on, yep, the Internet. Found more than one reference. Basically they were the same. The brass monkey was the rack on the deck that the cannonballs were stacked in. Language and its constant change is one of my "monkeys". I have to find out how it came to be what it is.
    Duane
    Could well be true, I'd like to see some more references to confirm it. One of those phases like "lock, stock and barrel" that have lost there meaning in modern usage. Makes ya wonder what "colder than a witches tit" meant. I lived in North Dakota and know what it means now. ;)
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

XXXVIII: Do-It-Yourself

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

XXXVII: Portable Potties and Dangerous Degrees

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • When You Gotta Go
    Outdoor living requires special attention to sanitation details. Major diseases such as e-coli poisoning can occur if done incorrectly or not done at all.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Camping   How To   Shelter   
    Comments:
    pisspoorperformer
    Two options when burying waste, depending on the number of people and length of stay, are a communal hole and individual holes. When staying for a week with a family of 5, I have dug a trench about a metre deep, after each use a small amount of soil is added to deter flies and pests. This works well. For a larger group(~50) in a very remote location (Australian Desert ~500km from nearest settlement) , I have dug a large hole about 2 metres deep, using two 205Litre (44 Gallon) drums as side support, note that this takes around a day to complete. The other option is individual holes. A new hole is dug for each occasion that nature calls. A book 'how to shit in the woods' suggests that prior to burying, some soil containing organic matter is 'stirred in', to improve the natural break-down. Note that it doesn't take very long to achieve ALOT of holes eg a family of 5 might make 15 holes in a few days! - etiquet such as leaving a vertical stick in the ground can prevent a nasty suprise when digging. Burial of human waste should be limited to locations away from water ways, and only in areas with very infrequent visitors, or if there is no other option.
    faultroy
    Sorry Rogue Turtle, but your information as to what to do with human waste--(burying it at least 10 inches deep is not only incorrect, but environmentally unsound). Pretty much every outdoors article will tell you to only bury it about 6 inches deep, and never below the top soil, since it is the beneficial bacteria and other assorted bugs that break down human manure. Burying it 10 inches deep theorectically brings it below the area that microbes in the soil break down the waste. Otherwise, the article sounds fine as it is. Keep up the good work.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Cold Weather Survival
    We've all been fooled by Mother Nature when we leave our homes on a "balmy" winter's day when we only have on a light wind-breaker jacket to keep warm. Then, for some reason, we can't get home during the daylight hours. As night falls, so does the temperature. Here are several ideas for surviving inthe cold.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   How To   Safety   Weather   
    Comments:
    chilbert007
    He probably left out the candle because candles have a tendency to melt when left in a vehicle whose interior temperature can exceed that of 120 degrees F in the heat. It is also important to note that in the "Vehicle Kits for Winter" section of the article, Rogue mentions stocking fire making supplies with the word etcetera meaning the inclusion of like things for the purpose provided. Candles fit in that etcetera category.
    mngidg
    Along with that candle, have a coffee can with a nail sticking up in the middle....you can fill the can with your candles, matches, granola bars etc....then when you need to use them in the car...place the candle upright in the can over the nail....the can will act like a heater...heating up with the heat of the candle and thus making it warmer than just the candle alone...From Minnesota
    Rich
    My favorite tinders are petroleum jelly and cotton balls, and 0000 steel wool. The wool catches sparks nicely, and can be lit with a battery; the PJ-soaked cotton ball will burn up to 5 minutes, for those times when the wood will NOT co-operate. --Rich
    staboy
    I've heard the same about candles (recently on Fox related to the Kim family marooned in the snow), preferably the big boutique kind, and wondered what the carbon monoxide production from a big candle is. Combustion is obviously incomplete, judging from the smoke. Evidently from such a small source the car must be tightly closed to raise the temperature, unlike a high tech fabric shelter. Does anybody know if there has been CO poisoning from such a use in a no-wind-leak new car over long periods? Clever toxicologists and chemists might be able to work out the CO production per kilogram of wax (Oh, Canada metric) versus the lethal dose per kilogram body weight and draw some time curves, but hey, it doesn't get that cold in Florida.
    faultroy
    Hey Rogue good info on the car for winter survival, but you left out a key item for the vehicle--a nice candle--preferably a long burning survival candle. In Canada--I'm told-- every person has some candles and matches in the vehicle in the event of a blizzard and the road not being passable. That one candle in a vehicle (and of course having a slight crack in the window to facilitate and air exchange will keep a person above freezing. I read about this in a number of publications, and I would suggest that you add it two your repetoire. You can also say the same for a snow hut or an igloo. That one candle should keep a person pretty comfortable.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

XXXVI: From Huts to Heat Stroke

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Clan of the Cave Turtle: Native American Shelters
    While the ingenuity of civilization may make improvements upon the wick-up, arbors, huts and shelters of the Native Americans, we must not forget that these native shelters have been used with success for centuries.
    Categories:  History   Shelter   
    Comments:
    will toomes
    Why don't you show Daniel Beard's book in orignal form? For, "Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it" George Santayana. Toss political correctness where it belongs, in the garbage.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • First Aid: Hot Weather
    Heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke are usually associated with strenuous exercise, but can occur in any person, at any time during hot weather. Somewhere in the world today, maybe where you are, it is going to be very hot. Read on to learn the signs and solutions for heat-related illness.
    Categories:  First Aid   Water   Weather   
    Comments:
    williamneiggemann@cox.net
    I spent 10 years in the Arizona Army National Guard where we spent several AT's (Annual Training) in the desert including Fort Irwin(near Death Valley). The consumption of alcoholic beverages and sodas ARE NOT RECOMMENDED in the desert because they increase dehydration. The only thing we drank was water, Gatorade, Kool Aid from the MRE's and coffee. The only reason for the coffee was some soldiers couldn't function without their caffeine fix.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

XXXV: Keeping it Clean

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Opinion: Outdoor Survival Philosophy
    The ability to use nature's bounty to our own advantage, for both food AND shelter is what separates us from lower forms of life. If you don't know how to live without all the modern computer-chip-based accessories we own, then you are in danger of losing skills basic to our instinct. That instinct is survival.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Disaster Preparedness   Opinions   Shelter   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Basic Skills: Washing Clothes
    A look back at how the simple task of washing clothes gradually evolved from the river rocks to various "easier" methods.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   How To   
    Comments:
    resq
    When Isabel came through Va, we didn't have power for 15 days. Life went on. We had a decent pantry, and plenty of stored water. The small generator we had would barely run the well pump. We needed to wash clothes, but most of the coin laundromats were either without power or had mile long lines. I made a homemade washer out of a 5 gal bucket and lid. I was lucky enough to be able to buy a new toilet plunger at the hardware store. I cut a small hole in the center of the bucket lid and put the handle through it. Put a few clothes in the bucket, add water and detergent, snap the lid on and up down up down! We sat on the back deck and plunged 10 or 15 minutes. Dump out the wash water and rinse until the water was clear. Then we hung out to dry. Hey, it worked! Still have that bucket in my basement, just in case, only now, I have drilled about 10 or 15 small holes in the top to make it easier to drain.
    Fautlroy
    Hey Rogue...I can't go that far back, but I do remember living in a cold water apartment in Chicago with no bath tub. We had to purchase a large wash tub to take a bath in. I still remember that. I also remember having this big round washing maching with a roller on it, and filling it with hot water (we had a gas stove as I recall) and watching it go to work. This was back in the middle 50's!!!! Thanks for posting this as it bring back old memories.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXXIV: Tent Time

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Basic Skills: Tent Drill
    Before you go out in the woods to play with the bears, it would be a good idea to at least have some idea on how to set up your tent. Today's modern materials and tent shapes and sizes are difficult to assemble if you haven't yet done so.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Camping   Tents   
    Comments:
    Rich
    My wife got one of those "dining tent" things -- you know, the ones with the screening on the sides. We both put it up in the back yard one day, and it was a royal pain to get the multi-section poles to fit the tent. Brute force came through. After takiing it down the next day, I saw the problem: TubeA was an inch or so shorter than TubeD, and I had reversed them! My solution was to break out the permanent markers, and put rings around each interlocking end. So, TubeA has 1 ring where it goes into TubeB (which has one ring on that end), and where TubeC fits into TubeB there are two rings around the ends, etc. This way I can put the frame together more easily. --Rich
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Power Camping: Tent Pegs
    You probably haven't seen a tent peg quite like this one. This special "RogueTurtle" edition was constructed by the old RogueTurtle in his back yard workshop. I dug out that welder again just to prove to myself, once and for all, that I am a terrible welder. But, it works.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Camping   Shelter   Tents   
    Comments:
    Willem
    Awesome! But for normal tents it can be much and much lighter. See www.countrystore.nl and search for 'twizel pegs'.
    Jon W. Spead
    Those are SOME tent pegs. However, you know they do show some good thinking. I really like the idea of being able to tie down the tent body well below the fly. What were you planing on using for your tie down material? And how much does the set of pegs weight? Oh, you might want to thing about manufacturing and selling those pegs. I assume that you are using them for car camping or bug-out only as might be a bit big and heavy for back-packing. Regards,
    W Featherstone-09-22-06
    Rt what a great idea , i too have gotten out the welder for some work, we are camper people, so we needed stakes to nhold down our awing from the wind , and i used much of the same idea , but added a 6" piece of galvanized pipe with a loop on it to be able to tie out our dogs and it works great . keep up your good work.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Review: Jericho
    This could be quite a good series by CBS. If the writers hold true to the principles of survival, this show could teach Americans a lot.
    Categories:  Opinions   
    Comments:
    Rusty
    A show by this name was aired on Space network a couple of years ago. You might be able to find it online if you look for it. I think it's the same; also I don't think it lasted very long.
    Pondering
    I just discovered (9/23/06) that the premier of Jerrico can be seen on the website. Go the the Jerrico website and click on "what happens beyond Jerico" link. Scroll down and you see the option to watch the full episode.
    New Jersey Cat-lover
    Let me see; the town's only ham-radio operator is alluded to & then pictured as a mentally "deficient" feeble-mind, and some local 'survivalists' are visually depicted as a bunch of Gung-Ho gun & flashlight-carrying near maniacs. I see (not) a great future for this series if it continues in that same vein. On the other hand, the outdoor shooting lots do seam realistic.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

XXXIII: Just in time for hurricane season

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

XXXII: Handguns and Hunkering Down

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Opinion: Tornado
    I wrote this article a few months ago and re-discovered it recently. Although the storm has long since passed, the next storm is always just around the corner...I have to ask myself, "Have I done all I can do to make my family safe?"
    Categories:  Disaster Preparedness   Opinions   Weather   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • The Armory: Handguns
    While there are hundreds of makes and models of shotguns out there to purchase, there are thousands of types, styles, and sizes of smaller handguns. Let's face it, you just cannot walk around your survival camp 24 hours a day carrying a loaded shotgun. Sometimes, you are going to have to put it down and rest. You don't want to be unarmed during those time periods when the shotgun is out of reach.
    Categories:  Armory   Guns   Safety   
    Comments:
    Sam
    I would like to point out that for survival purposes, it pays to consider the AK47 and variants for your primary weapon. Chambered in 7.62x39, the ammo is easy to find and can be bought very cheaply in bulk. The AK has a huge magazine capacity, and is arguable the finest, most reliable rifle ever made, which is why I own one. As for handguns, again, look to the "combloc" for affordable, reliable choices. I personally have chosen the CZ 82, chambered in 9mm Makarov. Superior in almost every respect. Again, ammo can be bought cheaply in bulk, Hope this helps.
    scott
    I have to agree with the 22.magnum rifle. Living in eastern Oregon and being a [not always leagal,but moraly just] food provider for my family,I've killed every thing from grouse to mule deer with a 22.mag rifle.There accurate,quiet,and plenty deadly.
    Faultroy
    Your article on shotguns and handguns was very interesting and informative. I however do not agree with most of the comments on bug out rifles and handguns. I own a number of custom rifles and handguns in both pistol and revolver configuration. I however consider the 22 mag rifle to be the best battle weapon and the 22 mag handgun to be the best sidearm. Let me explain...like you I own a Model 20 and 21 Glocks along with a Kimber Eclipse. By the way, all I shoot is the 45 and 44 mag. However I believe that the 22 Mag will allow one to carry far more bullets, and will eliminate a person just as well as a large bore handgun. For the suvivalist, especially those that plan on bugging out: moving fast,light and quietly is of prime importance. See how much a box of 50 rounds of 45 cal bullets weigh--quite a lot. With 22 mags, I can carry over 200 rounds for less than half the weight of a 45. Yeah, a shotgun and a 45 look mean and businesslike, but not too many people are going to consider the caliber of a weapon when it is pointing at them. And, a 22 Mag in the vitals will kill someone just as dead as a 45 ACP. A lot of your information is about car camping, and that is fine, but some of us are more into backpacking and that in itself is a totally different breed of cat. So if weight is not an issue, then certainly your advice is good, but it weight is critical (and I cannot imagine a genuine bug out situation where is would not be) then the 22 mag is the way to go.
    CM Hudson AKA Grundair
    Great article on weapons. For 30 years I have telling folks the advantages of a shot gun AND a good hand gun. I do have the standard SKS,, bolt actions etc type of "feel" good guns. But my primary bug out set is a Remington 870 Express, a bandeleer of shells 20 00 buck and 20 Lee cast slugs. and my Glock 21 and 3 mags. Sure my SKS shoots farther and faster, but nothing means business like the action being cycled on 12 gauge. Keep up the good work.
    Jon W. Spead
    The opinions on survival handguns are as many and varied as those on MBR's (main battle rifles), pick-up trucks and football teams. I personally feel that for the person with little or no handgun experience and who can't or won't put the time in to really become a top line shooter the best gun is a 4" to 6" barrel revolver in 357 caliber. For the individual willing to put in the time to become a truly good shot and who understands guns I feel a 1911 Colt in 45 ACP caliber is the way to go. My personal choice would be a custom piece from Wilson Combat or similar custom gun-shop but since I can't afford that, I go with a partially customized Glock 21. Your pice was well written and covered some very good points. Keep up the good work. Regards, J.W.S.
    Kevin Swindle
    Just wanted to say this is one of the best articles you have ever done. Keep up the good work.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXXI: Bowfishing

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Basic Skills: Bowfishing
    An article on the basics of bowfishing and the gear you need to get started. Bowfishing involves the use of a bow, an arrow and some fishing line attached to both the bow and the arrow. For many archery fans, bowfishing augments an all to short hunting season, allowing them to practice their skills all year long.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Fishing   Food   
    Comments:
    Charles in Texas
    Snapping turtle is also good fried, smoked, bbq'd so don't limit it to just soup.
    Richard in Louisiana
    I just read the article on bow fishing and I must correct a glaring mistake. The statement that Alligator Gar are not good eating is far from true. On the contrary, they are very good to eat when prepared properly and provide for a considerable amount of meat for their respective size. To get the meat from an Alligator Gar, you simply lay it on its belly, start behind the head and split down each side of the backbone. Peel the skin down and you'll find a "tenderloin" of boneless flesh almost all the way to the tail. Alligator Gar has been commercially harvested in Louisiana and S.E. Texas for decades for fish sticks. There is more than 1 "white fish".
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXX: Thirty Seconds on the Soapbox

My thirtieth issue is a bit different. Rather than "how to" or "need to know" stuff, I am taking a moment to share my thoughts on the state of things today. Enjoy. And please feel free to use the comment link below to send me your thoughts.
  • RogueTurtle Speaks Out
    The following article was written by RogueTurtle because it’s about time someone did. I have studiously avoided any article that could be considered “political” or controversial. I was concerned that if it didn’t relate directly to survival, people would think of my web site as just another "radical" right-wing site.

    The straw that broke the turtle’s back was the latest arrests in England of the 24 terrorists intent to blow up airliners en-route to the USA.
    Categories:  Leadership   Opinions   Threat Assessment   
    Comments:
    Sick of tip toeing
    So when are the "peace loving" Muslims going to start expressing their outrage to these fanatics' actions? By staying silent, they offend the roots of their religion by allowing the extremists to represent them in the world's arena.
    t fowler
    Rogue you are just stating the truth. If that is political, then it's just too bad. It is still the truth...
    New Jersey Cat Lover
    Well said, Turtle. No; make that *very* well said. I've just posted the page-url to my NSP, and hopefully a great-many more people shall see it and read that page. Oh yes; if anyone subscribes to Easynews, look in 'easynews.general', under the article/page topic.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXIX: Biological Warfare

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXVIII: Making Char Cloth

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • How To: Make Char Cloth
    Char Cloth is probably the best and cheapest form of do-it-yourself fire starter I have ever used. I am amazed at how long I lived before I found out about this really old form of tinder. It is really a method of making Charcoal from a 100% cotton tee shirt. Includes the first-ever RogueTurtle video!
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Fire   How To   Popular   Video   
    Comments:
    Sleepingbear
    Make double sure your cotton is 100% pure. Manmade materials tend to melt. I have always used cotton diaper cloth, or good outing weight flannel, has more "knap" to catch the inital spark.
    Rick
    Howdy. Good article. The char cloth works well to catch the spark from a traditional flint and steel rig. When I make char cloth, I use an old 1/2 pint finish can. These cans have a locking lid, like a paint can. I poke a hole in the lid with a nail and commence cooking.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXVII: Fur and Fowl

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXVI: Nocturnal Life

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXV: More Critters

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXIV: Coping with Bugs and Bombs

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXIII: Poison Pills

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXII: Communication

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Bug Out: Communication for Survival
    When it is time to go, how will you keep in touch with your group, your friends and family, and the media? This article provides a wide range of options and, of course, my opinions on the best choices for the prepared reader.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Communication   Tools   
    Comments:
    Art Jury KF7GD
    I agree with Mosby's men. It is not hard to get a basic Ham ticket now and the information you learn will go a long way to filling in your basic communications knowledge, applying it by using your gear will help a lot more. Like the difference in reading about making char cloth and actually doing it. For local comms 2meter handhelds (walky talkies) would be fine, easy to find a a pair for $100 to $150. 10 meter radios are really cheap right now and would have coverage very close to CB if you pay more than $50 to $100 for one you paid to much. Thanks for the site great info, I found it when looking for char cloth to go with the fire piston I'll be making this week with my son. Thanks a bunch! If you want more info on ham radio let me know, happy to share. I can be contacted with my call (after my name)@arrl.net
    Ken Wood
    MURS radios are a great way to stay in touch with your family/group during an emergency. While equipment is not very popular there are some sources available: http://rkleef.com http://mursradio.blogspot.com Being FM, you won't have the noise that CB has and they are a bit more private if you require it.
    mosby's men
    good article but your information on ham radio is not correct. most all ham radios run off 12 vdc makes them great for mobile use. i made my first HF radio antenna out of 16'of old electrical cord (a diapole) i made my first 2 meter vhf antenna out of scrap and a 2 dollar radio shack part it still works 10 years later. my wife went from knowing nothing to passing her test in two weeks . the basic class of lisc now requires NO morse code, the higher classes is only 5 words a minute of morse code and that is probally going to go away totally before much longer. get a hold of a gordon west book on the lisc you want , every question and answer from the test is in the back of the book word for word. go in and highlight all the right answers then study just the question and the right answer. when you get your lisc and your talking on the air you can figure out what you really need to know . join a ham radio club ,knowing i was just starting out members sold me radios and power supplys for less then they could have sold them to other people for . you can get a 2 meter handheld for 100 bucks and a 2 meter mobile rig for 250 bucks and im talking about quality equipment. 2 meter is for somewhat local information across the street to 70 miles . you can use a repeater to extend distance or just talk radio to radio . distance can be increased 3 ways the amount of power put out the hight of the antenna or the quality of the antenna i.e using a yagi beam antenna rather then a diapole . every year at the end of june i run my hf radio out in the field from a 12 volt deep cycle battery . the main thing you need to ask your self is :who do i really need to talk to ? i can talk around the world but in a emergency how will that help me , my brother 2k miles away cant help me . but the guy 50 miles a way might be able to .. also the further you talk the more people will hear what you say .
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Bug Out: Radio Frequencies
    A crystal clear chart of radio frequencies and their assignment for various purposes.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Communication   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XXI: Bug Out and Blast Away

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XX: The Armory

Wow! I am pleased to offer our 20th edition. Many thanks to all my regular readers - I am honored by the positive feedback and hundreds of people that have signed up for regular updates.

I have started a new series that addresses firearm ownership and survival use.

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XIX: Catfish, Crawfish, and Cooking 'em Up

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XVIII: Need to Know Now

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Also, I want to welcome all the visitors from MSM (misc_survivalism_moderated). I appreciate your readership. If you have not read MSM, please use the link to check out their group.

As always, enjoy and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XVII: Leadership

The theme this time is leading a group in a suvival situation.

A group is usually defined as 3 or more people with a single goal. This could be a family group or a circle of family and friends. The key is the single goal. In the true survivalist sense, this means escaping a disaster and moving to a safer location. Notice I didn't say "safe", just safer. Sometimes you just have to face the fact that no place is perfectly safe, no matter where you are.
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XVI: Bug Out Review

Sorry, folks. Went to Vegas for a week and came back to find that the elves had not stepped up to do my job. So, I will be looking to hire new elves, then putting together the next newsletter as time permits.

In the meantime, here are some popular "bug out" articles from past issues:
  • Need to Know: Bug Out Kits
    Contrary to what the late "Mister Rodgers" sang, it's not always "a wonderful day in the neighborhood". Sometimes it can just plain suck. When you have to leave, you can't use something you do not have.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Bug Out   Disaster Preparedness   Popular   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Basics: Bug Out Toolkits
    Today's workshops are marvels of modern invention full of dust throwing, wood cutting, steel bending, electric, pneumatic, hydraulic, power packed beasts of convenience that would make Tim Allen proud. But you just beat feet and have to make do without tools that need more than elbow grease. Here's my list of bug out tools.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Disaster Preparedness   Popular   Tools   
    Comments:
    faultroy
    While I think the tools mentioned are extremely well thought out, I seriously question the logic of so many tools for one's bugout kit. Granted, everyone's definition will be different and everyone's tool requirements will be different, but for the most part few if any of those items will be necessary. There is a tendency to want to take everything. The reality is that no one should take more than they can carry on their back comfortably. If you can't do that, you really don't need it. The items mentioned would be great however for a bugout retreat.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Bug Out: Pooch Packs
    The storm is coming, the water is rising, or the flames are creeping closer. It is time to pack up and scram. What about mans' best friend? Everyone should carry what they need to survive - including the family pet.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Dogs   Popular   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Gear Up: Packs for Working Dogs
    Now you know what the family pet needs to take on the road. But there is no need for you and your loved ones to bear Rover's burden. Take a look at some of these options for letting your dog carry his/her own weight.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Dogs   Popular   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XV: Cold, Canning and Chestnut

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XIV: Hot Water

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XIII: Lucky Thirteen

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Basic Skills: Basic Vegetables
    No matter where you go in an emergency or survival situation, the length of time you can live depends on the amount of water you can drink, and the amount of food you can eat. You can "back-pack" in all the food you physically can, but it still won't be enough unless you can restock your shelves. Even a small garden can mean the difference between life and death. You can eat fish and game, but to have a good diet you need vegetables, too.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Food   How To   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Roughing It: Tent Hammocks
    There are a growing number of campers who choose to sleep in hammocks. The problem with most hammocks is that you are exposed to the elements, both rain and bugs. Now, new gear has been developed to take that problem away. The Tent-Hammock is a combination of both the tent (with bug screens) and a hammock.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Camping   Shelter   Tents   
    Comments:
    kf7gd
    Hello, I believe you missed Speer hammocks. http://www.speerhammocks.com/index.html My boys have been using them in their rooms as bunk hammocks since the youngest was 4. We also camp outside with them. The first ones I made using the book Mr Speer wrote. Great camping tips as well. Thanks, Art.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Trappers' Corner: Nets
    Netting game is almost without exception, illegal in the U.S. If caught, you could face stiff fines. I only point out this option so that, when all else fails, you have yet another source of food for you and your starving family.
    Categories:  Fishing   Food   Knots   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XII: Tents, Traps, and Techno-toys

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue XI: Wild Life

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue X: Beavers, Beagles, and Bugging Out

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue IX: Booby Traps, Soap, and Rope

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue VIII: Tools of the Trade

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Basics: Bug Out Toolkits
    Today's workshops are marvels of modern invention full of dust throwing, wood cutting, steel bending, electric, pneumatic, hydraulic, power packed beasts of convenience that would make Tim Allen proud. But you just beat feet and have to make do without tools that need more than elbow grease. Here's my list of bug out tools.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Disaster Preparedness   Popular   Tools   
    Comments:
    faultroy
    While I think the tools mentioned are extremely well thought out, I seriously question the logic of so many tools for one's bugout kit. Granted, everyone's definition will be different and everyone's tool requirements will be different, but for the most part few if any of those items will be necessary. There is a tendency to want to take everything. The reality is that no one should take more than they can carry on their back comfortably. If you can't do that, you really don't need it. The items mentioned would be great however for a bugout retreat.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • How To: Build a Shaving Horse
    No, it's not how Trigger gets ready for a night on the town. A shaving horse is a tool for holding your work for shaping. A combination of a bench and a vise, it has been a staple in woodworking shops for centuries.
    Categories:  How To   Tools   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Trapper's Corner: More Traps & Snares
    Did you practice all the snares and traps I talked about in my earlier article? Well, if you mastered those, here's a whole new set to make sure you don't go hungry.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Food   Traps   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue VII: Out and About

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Basics: First Aid Kits
    Somewhere between a Band-Aid and a surgical kit is the perfect first aid kit for you. What do you need to have? Will you know what to do with the kit you have? Having the right supplies and training will ensure you are ready to respond.
    Categories:  Bug Out   Camping   Disaster Preparedness   First Aid   Popular   Safety   
    Comments:
    J.White
    I totally agree with the contents that you listed for first aid kits and that "preparers" should get proper first aid training. Any "bug out" scenario could involve a trauma situation. As mentioned in the article, 911 may not be available and hospitals could be overwhelmed. I would add several Israeli Trauma Bandages in different sizes, a few Nasal Airway Tubes and a few SAM Splints to your first aid kit(s). These items are contained in Military Individual First Aid Kits (IFAK) and "Blow Out Kits" or individually from various web sites. I would suggest shopping around on the web for the best prices. RemoteMedical.com is a great place to start. Training videos on how to use Israeli bandages can be found on various sites on the web, such as You-Tube. I would suggest for "preparers" to take a "First Responders" course at your local community college.
    suntzu
    Tampons. They are sterile, absorb large amounts of blood, and are the perfect shape as well for bullet/stab wounds. Plus, they are available in bulk for cheap.
    Jim Dorsett
    To save on weight and space (& money), sterile gauze pads can be substituted for the eye patches. I would also add: 1) occlusive dressing(aluminum foil or vaseline gauze)(for neck, chest, abdominal wounds) 2) mole skin(for blister prevention and treatment)
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • Trapper's Corner: Traps and Snares
    The first in a series of articles focused on trapping. Up first are some basic traps and trapping techniques. Read this or go hungry.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Food   Traps   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • How To: Sourdough Bread
    Sourdough bread is a tradition that started somewhere around the campfires of the American pioneers and continues among die-hard traditionalists, such as the Rogue Turtle. If there ever was a bread that exemplifies the pioneer spirit, it is the Sourdough Bread.
    Categories:  Food   How To   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue VI: Nuclear Family

If you are unclear about everything nuclear, this is the issue for you. I have compiled several articles that address different facets of life in the nuclear age.

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue V: Fleeing, Fowl, and Frozen Fish

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue IV: Go, Fish, and Multiply

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue III: Outdoor Living

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue II. Proper Planning...

Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle

Issue I. Maiden Voyage

Welcome to the first Rogue Turtle Newsletter. Below are the links to the columns in this issue:
  • Yeah, But...
    Lessons that should be learned in the wake of hurricane Katrina. Specifically, Rogue Turtle examines the true cost of talking yourself out of preparing for disaster with a simple "Yeah, but..." excuse.
    Categories:  Disaster Preparedness   Opinions   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • How To: Build a Fire in a Safe Place
    One of Rogue Turtle's first books was an epic called "Turtle's Campfire Cookbook". Chapter one of this book is called "Build a fire in a safe place". Since the control of fire is one of the MOST ESSENTIAL skills any survivalist can learn, it seems that a good place to start is with building a good, safe fire.
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Camping   Fire   How To   Safety   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • How To: Make Char Cloth
    Char Cloth is probably the best and cheapest form of do-it-yourself fire starter I have ever used. I am amazed at how long I lived before I found out about this really old form of tinder. It is really a method of making Charcoal from a 100% cotton tee shirt. Includes the first-ever RogueTurtle video!
    Categories:  Basic Skills   Fire   How To   Popular   Video   
    Comments:
    Sleepingbear
    Make double sure your cotton is 100% pure. Manmade materials tend to melt. I have always used cotton diaper cloth, or good outing weight flannel, has more "knap" to catch the inital spark.
    Rick
    Howdy. Good article. The char cloth works well to catch the spark from a traditional flint and steel rig. When I make char cloth, I use an old 1/2 pint finish can. These cans have a locking lid, like a paint can. I poke a hole in the lid with a nail and commence cooking.
    ** Add your comments on this article **

  • History: Rogue Turtle's Teepee
    Here's my all-time favorite. Not because it is the best or the strongest or the easiest, but because of all the memories it brings back to me.
    Categories:  Camping   History   Tents   
    ** Add your comments on this article **

Enjoy, and thanks for reading...Rogue Turtle


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